Making the switch to electric tenders

Laneva Vesper 001

Making the switch to electric tenders

Laneva Vesper 001

Purpose

Making the switch to electric tenders

In an industry where sustainability is increasingly in the spotlight, it’s hardly surprising that demand for electric tenders is on the rise.

By Dominique Afacan | 18 January 2021

Back in 2014, Swedish entrepreneur and engineer Gustav Hasselskog used to speed his kids by motorboat from his summer island cottage to the nearby fuel station to buy ice cream. Frustrated at the gas costs for these little trips, he decided to find a solution. The result? The Candela Seven, a carbon fibre, electric hydrofoiling boat with a top speed of 30 knots.

The company has since started collaborating with the superyacht industry, where the Candela is increasingly being seen as a new generation tender. “We believe Candela Seven is the perfect electric tender; not only does it have superior range and speed, but it also doesn’t create a wake and so does not disturb other boaters or marine life,” says PR & communications manager Mikael Mahlberg. “It is also incredibly fun to drive! Skimming above the sea surface at 30 knots without noise or slamming is just insanely fun.”

Making the switch to electric tenders

Candela Seven

Making the switch to electric tenders

Candela Seven

Of course, the benefits of going electric go far beyond cost and noise – and in an industry where the word sustainability is being used more than ever – the environmental benefits are paramount. For Francois Richard, it was one of the main motivations for launching Laneva, where he is CEO. “Sustainability is now taking over the yachting industry and I believe that the electric tender is one of the easiest ways for superyachts to start moving towards a more sustainable future,” he says.

Their first model perfectly reflects this. The 100% electric Laneva Vesper 001 is made out of sustainable plywood, natural linen fibre, natural cork and recyclable leatherette. As far as performance goes, Richard warns against listening to tired stereotypes about battery-powered vessels. “Perhaps we are inclined to associate electric boats with slow ferries, transportation or tourist boats,” he says. “The truth is, some electric motors are particularly powerful. The Lanéva boat can reach a top speed of 30 knots, as well as a range of approximately 40 nautical miles at a speed of 20 knots. Those are high-performance characteristics, given the usage and purpose of a tender.”

Making the switch to electric tenders

Laneva Vesper 001

Making the switch to electric tenders

Laneva Vesper 001

It’s a similar story at Candela which has a range of 50 nautical miles at 20 knots, and a top speed of 30 knots. “It’s also incredibly cheap to run,” says Mahlberg. “A full battery – 50 nautical miles – is five euro.” The new generation of electric boats like these is equipped with the latest tech, leaving no room for unwelcome surprises. “In other words, you can know at any given time the level of battery’s consumption and plan your journey accordingly,” says Richard.

Richard points to a future where there will be environmental rules and regulations in superyacht destinations, making even more of an argument for electric tenders. “Because electric motors present emission-free, low vibration and silent characteristics, there are no driving bans for e-boats; whereas fuel boats are forbidden on many lakes, like in Germany and Austria,” he says. “It is also said that by 2025, internal combustion engines will be banned in Amsterdam. These are the first examples but we can imagine having similar regulations in superyacht destinations.”

Making the switch to electric tenders

Candela Seven

Making the switch to electric tenders

Candela Seven

It’s unsurprising, then, that there are a few models vying for the attention of the superyacht industry. The award-winning, Swedish-made X Shore is another of the electric crafts getting noticed. On a self-professed mission to set the course for long term sustainability, their boats are already being used on environmental initiatives such as AIM ZERO, helping to clean up waterways around Sweden. While the boats can be used in their own right in this way, they are also perfectly suited to being adapted for use as superyacht tenders.

It’s a similar story at British firm Patterson Boatworks, with their elegant Elektra boat made with English oak, cherry and douglas fir, and at Holland’s Dutchcraft, where their latest model offers 75 minutes of cruising time at 32 knots.

Whichever tender appeals, the knock-on benefits apply to all. “Because electrical engines provide instant torque at low speed, e-boats are easier to manoeuvre, especially in marinas,” says Richard. “And while combustion engines need all kinds of systems to operate, such as air filters, complex exhaust systems, and so forth, if you look at the engine room of an electrical vessel, it looks simple and neat.” Last but not least, with all things considered, the cost of ownership and operations are generally deemed to be around ten times less expensive. Little wonder the superyacht industry is preparing to charge those batteries.

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